Medical Billing Blog: Section - HIPAA

Archive of all Articles in the HIPAA Section

This is the archive containing links to all articles written in the HIPAA section of our blog.

Click any of the article links below to read the entire article or browse another section to the right to read articles on another subject.

61% of Physicians Say EHR Systems Reduce Clinical Efficiency

“EHR systems continue to fall short of provider expectations and detract from the joys of practicing medicine, according to a recent national survey by The Doctors Company. More than 3,400 physicians from 49 states and the District of Columbia offered their perspective on EHR technology, federal regulations, value-based care, patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), and other aspects of the healthcare system. Survey respondents included surgical specialists, primary care providers, and nonsurgical specialists. The majority of respondents were 51 and older. Overall, the majority of surveyed physicians reported that EHR systems have had a negative impact on the patient-provider relationship, clinical workflows, and clinical productivity. Fifty-four percent of surveyed physicians stated their

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Patients Cannot File HIPAA Lawsuits

A U.S. district court judge in Washington, D.C., on June 15 dismissed a case by a patient who alleged Laboratory Corporation of America, or LabCorp, violated HIPAA, reaffirming the precedent that individual patients cannot file lawsuits for alleged HIPAA violations, according to GovInfoSecurity. Here are five things to know about the case: 1. The district court’s ruling dismissed a lawsuit filed by a patient of Washington, D.C.-based Providence Hospital. According to the lawsuit, the patient underwent laboratory testing from LabCorp during a June 2017 hospital visit. During the visit, the former patient said she was instructed to submit medical information at a computer intake station that was allegedly within eyesight

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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CMS Modifies E/M EHR Clinical Documentation Requirements

The American College of Physicians (ACP) recently applauded a CMS decision to change EHR clinical documentation requirements. Teaching physicians can now verify medical student documentation in a patient’s EHR related to evaluation and management (E/M) code services. “Prior to the change, physicians were required to re-document most work performed by medical students — which is often very thorough and based on careful and supervised evaluation — rather than review, refer to, amend, or correct the student note,” clarified ACP President Jack Ende, MD in a public statement. Changing the EHR clinical documentation requirement allows teaching physicians to educate medical students about EHR use within a more streamlined workflow and reduces

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Healthcare security compliance in the cloud

The “cloud” has almost become a buzzword in health IT, with many hospitals considering a shift to remote servers to reduce costs and improve scalability. However, some executives have hesitated, given the cyber-security implications of accessing protected health information through the internet. “It’s like online shopping,” Shaung Liu, chief technology officer of the provider division at Teladoc, said during a Microsoft-sponsored workshop at the Becker’s Hospital Review 3rd Annual Health IT + Revenue Cycle Conference Sept. 21 in Chicago. “When you first did online shopping nobody wanted to put their credit card in the cloud … you didn’t trust it,” he explained. “Now, everybody does.” Teladoc, a telehealth company that

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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EHR companies refuted claims of violating HIPAA

The EHR Association (EHRA) Executive Committee has fired back at accusations that EHR companies are partially to blame for interoperability problems, claiming health data exchange is progressing quickly. The association published a response to an earlier post on Health Affairs Blog that accused EHR and health IT companies of monetizing the custody of patient protected health information (PHI). Former ONC Chief Privacy Officer Lucia Savage urged the Office of Inspector General (OIG) to enforce provisions of HIPAA prohibiting business associates such as EHR developers from using PHI for business operations. She stated some EHR companies may be leveraging ownership of patient PHI for profit. “Building a revenue stream out of

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Understanding HIPAA’s Medical Record Transfer Rules

“I recently received an inquiry from a physician who was frustrated by patients returning to his practice multiple times seeking copies of the same medical records. He described a situation where he (“Physician A”) had properly transferred a patient’s medical records to a new physician (“Physician B”). The patient then left Physician B to transfer to Physician C. Physician B was willing to transfer his own medical record for the patient to Physician C, but did not include the portion of the medical record provided by Physician A. Physician A was then required to provide his medical record to the patient again and wondered whether this was a common issue

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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How to Collaborate for EHR Usability

The number of health IT developers and products has increased significantly as a result of federal incentives for EHR adoption but correlates with the rise of provider dissatisfaction with the usability of these systems. What providers expect from their EHR systems and what health IT developers deliver have proved not to be one in the same. This disconnect points to the need for the latter to focus on the needs of the former and deliver EHR technology that is user-centered. Therefore, collaboration between health IT developers and clinical end-users is key to ensuring EHR systems are user-friendly in an industry rapidly adopting new technologies year after year to tackle new

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Are Biometrics the Future of HIPAA Security?

Medical electronic health records, or EHRs for short, may have the potential to be much more secure than conventional records. That sounds like a bold claim in light of news about data breaches involving personal information. In fact, according to a report from the Identity Theft Resource Center and CyberScout, the number of tracked data breaches in the United States in 2016 hit an all-time high of 1,093. And still, more than 78% of doctors use EHRs, says the CDC. For medical professionals and the healthcare industry as a whole, keeping sensitive data secure and adhering to HIPAA regulations is a top priority. After all, EHRs can include years of

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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