Archive for The Month of August, 2007

Archive for the Month of August, 2007

Welcome to the medical billing blog archive for the month of August, 2007.

Here you will find links to every article added to the Outsource Management Group web site during the month of August, 2007.

You can browse this month's archives by clicking the "More" button from any of the excerpts below.

Aural Rehab Not Reimbursed?

Medical billing changes occur throughout each and every year and keeping up with those changes can be confusing. Aural Rehabilitation has become one major area of confusion since the 2006 update. The medical billing changes to Aural Rehab CPT codes has wrongly caused many people to believe Aural Rehabilitation is no longer a reimbursable service. Medicare actually assigned status code “I” to all new medical billing codes for auditory rehabilitation. These codes are 92630 and 92633. This means that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will not pay for auditory rehabilitation, only diagnostic audiology. However, this is only true if an audiologist performs the service and the medical billing.

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Code Designations Determine When to Use Modifier 59

When do I use medical billing modifier 59? This is a great question. It is one that many don’t ask, but most don’t know the correct answer to. One of the most important things to know about the medical billing modifier 59 is which code on which to append it. There are some basic medical billing rules that can teach you which code to use with modifier 59. The general assumption about modifier 59 (Distinct procedural service) is that it should be linked to the lower-valued code of the pair. Although this may be true a lot of times, it is not always true. There is a much better rule

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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The Inside Scoop on Medical Billing for Tissue Adhesives

Coding for tissue adhesives can be confusing because there isn’t one set procedure for this. The coding that is used is determined by the type of wound and the severity of the repair when tissue adhesives are used for wound closures. The answer to this question will be different depending on which entity is paying the medical billing claim. When you code for the use of tissue adhesives, including Dermabond; Medicare has its own guidelines for reporting this procedure that you need to follow to be reimbursed. You should report G0168 for Medicare patients only. If you are reporting the procedure for a non-Medicare patient, you should use the CPT

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Gastric Bypass Codings Becoming More Common

As a medical biller, you may be seeing an increase in the number of gastric bypass claims that you are handling as more and more insurances are covering this procedure as a measure to remove the patient from danger of developing more serious, chronic and costly illnesses that can stem from being grossly obese. After a patient has undergone gastric bypass surgery, eventually they will have the band removed. Many medical billing professionals are amiss at whether to include modifier 59 with their claim in order to obtain reimbursement for the procedure. Under The Correct Coding Initiative (CCI), normally the procedure of removing the band and port removal would be

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Can Your Practice Benefit From the Auditory Rehabilitation Boost?

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have recently made it known that the reimbursement for procedural code 92696 is going to be increases by a rather large amount. To clarify a little bit further, the reimbursement to providers for such a procedure will come in at approximately four times the amount being received currently. This should make any of the providers of language, speech and hearing much happier when it comes to medical billing. This entire thought of reimbursement may be a lot clearer if it is broken down a bit. For example, the code 92626 which is known for the description of Evaluation of Auditory Rehabilitation Status; first

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Separating Payments on Separate Tests Performed

Did you know that you can actually bill separate tests performed from your practice for separate payments? Certain practices have been taking advantage of larger reimbursements by doing just that. Say that you have a patient that is new to your practice and they are coming in for an exam. You can both bill for that exam and then bill separate for any other tests or screenings that they will be having performed. Although you may feel as though you are doing something wrong when it comes to medical billing practices such as these. However, the important Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services have been doing a good amount of

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Using Place of Service Codes Correctly

More and more carriers are cracking down on medical billing claims that have a lack of or incorrect place of service code. Even with the correct current procedural terminology code for E/M services, a medical billing claim that does not have a correct POS code will get your claim denied. It is a common occurrence in medical billing for the place of service codes to be misused or left out. There are several current procedural terminology codes for an evaluation and management session that correspond to different medical billing place of service codes. When using CPT 99341 (Home visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient) through 99350

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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The Sensitive Issue of Handling Hard Copies

A question that comes up often is exactly how should a medical practice dispose of the hard copies of files? The answer isn’t rocket science, shredding is the only good answer. When you are ready to dispose of hard copies medical files, anything with a patient’s name on it should be shredded. If you don’t have the staff available and you don’t want to invest in an industrial-sized shredder, a good alternative would be to hire an outside shredding service that will either come to your offices and shred on site; or pick up your files, lock and store them in sealed containers and put them on a closed end

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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