Medical Billing Blog: Section - Medical Data

Archive of all Articles in the Medical Data Section

This is the archive containing links to all articles written in the Medical Data section of our blog.

Click any of the article links below to read the entire article or browse another section to the right to read articles on another subject.

Do You Know the Three "R’s" of Consulting Reimbursements?

Since consultation requirements have increased in the last year as far as criteria for getting them reimbursed in your medical billing claims, there are some criteria you must be certain that your claims meet in order to justify using codes 99241-99255. It used to be simple and medical billing consultant merely had to meet the three “R’s” in order to justify medical billing claims for consultations. However the criteria for what does and does not constitute a consultation has changed and in order to make sure that your medical billing claims are paid, you need to reacquaint yourself with the three R’s of medical billing for consultations. The three R’s

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Definity Still Definitely a Problem in 2007

The injectable contract agent named Perflutren better known as Definity has caused a lot of confusion as many providers are billing the incorrect code and Medicare and most other large payors switched the code for this service in late 2005 and 2 years later it’s still showing up on medical billing and causing numerous delays and rejections on medical billing reimbursements. If you’re a service provider that is still billing A9700, you could face delays in getting paid–or even denials on your medical billing claims. If the carrier approves the main echocardiography procedure, then it will usually approve the use of Definity as contrast. If you are not sure of

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Wound Closure Medical Billing -Dermabond or Stitches?

When a wound needs closing and a tissue adhesive is used the medical billing coding can be different than when sutures or stitches are used. There are specific guidelines for medical billing when tissue adhesives are used. All adhesives including Dermabond have their own unique way of being reported on medical billing. Consult with Medicare or the carrier to ensure that you are meeting those guidelines prior to submitting your medical billing. There are five basic guidelines that Medicare requires in order to reimburse for this service and many carriers follow the same criteria for laceration closures utilizing Dermabond. You should report G0168 for Medicare patients only; the CPT code

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Medical Billing for TB Screenings Made Easy

TB is in the news more and more and if you aren’t already seeing an increase in TB screenings, it’s likely your practice could experience it in the future. If you have a medical billing claim involving a patient that is at an increased risk for tuberculosis (TB) infection or is already having symptoms, a TB screening can be performed. If your practice runs these tests, be aware that in many cases, you can get reimbursed for the test as a medical necessity. When processing the medical billing for a TB skin test (86580) or blood test (86480) due to pulmonary TB symptoms or known TB exposure or risk. The

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Medical Billing Dilemma: Adjustment of Gastric Band

Sometimes after a gastric band procedure, the band may slip during healing and need to be adjusted. The uncertain thing is how to bill the procedure since you have already billed the global. HCPCS temporary code S2083 (Adjustment of gastric band diameter via subcutaneous port by injection or aspiration of saline) or CPT code 43771 but both of these require that the physician use a laparoscope during the procedure and usually moving the band is done through injecting saline or removing saline from the band to make it easier to adjust through a subQ port. For most instances you can use S2083, normally you will only use 43771 if patient

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Break Out Well-Woman-Care Visits For Better Reimbursements

A little known fact about well-woman care is that in many cases, you can break out the breast exam and pap smear and realize a reimbursement for both procedures if the patient is covered by Medicare. If the physician provides a complete well-woman exam for a Medicare patient, you should report G0101 (Cervical or vaginal cancer screening; pelvic and clinical breast examination) for the breast and pelvic exams. When the physician also obtains a Pap smear, use Q0091 (Screening Papanicolaou smear; obtaining, preparing and conveyance of cervical or vaginal smear to laboratory)and this will enable your practice to realize a reimbursement for both services. Just make sure that you have

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Taking the Headache Out of Credentialing

Are you swamped? So overwhelmed with patients, billing, invoices, emergencies and other day to day practice worries that you don’t even have the time to get yourself credentialed with all the carriers possible. No one has to tell you that the more insurances you accept, the more patients you can see and the more revenue you can generate for your practice. Credentialing is the key. Did you know your medical billing partner can take some of the heat off you and not only compile and submit your medical billing, they can also get your practice credentialed with any carrier you choose. If you have a busy practice, you may be

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Servicing Hospitals? Know Your CCR

Your provider number has a strong impact on your medical billing cost to charge ratio (CCR). If your hospital is merging with another hospital, it is important to figure in the possibly new Cost to Charge Ratio medical billing payments you will receive. There are two avenues merging hospitals can take. The first method is when two hospitals merge together while one of the existing provider numbers is kept in tact. In this instance, one hospital keeps their medical billing number, while the other one drops theirs and joins the first. The hospital that drops their medical billing provider number will receive a new cost to charge ratio. The ratio

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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