Medical Billing Blog: Section - Medical Data

Archive of all Articles in the Medical Data Section

This is the archive containing links to all articles written in the Medical Data section of our blog.

Click any of the article links below to read the entire article or browse another section to the right to read articles on another subject.

Digit Removal Medical Billing Questions

Just when you got a handle of medical billing, another policy throws a curve ball at you. In some instances, the same CPT code is used for two different procedures. An example of this is when performing both and extra digit removal and a skin tag removal. The same medical billing CPT code, 11200, would be used in both of these instances. The medical billing code 11200 means, removal of skin tags, multiple fibrocutaneous tags, any area; up to and including 15 lesions. This means that if an individual needs an extra digit AND a skin tag removed, than you would use 11200 to report both. To let the payers

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Getting the Indirect Supervision Code Right in Three Steps

For help with performing the care plan oversight services if you are having a hard time with the 993xx series these steps should help to get you started. Step one is to count these care services as 99374-99380. The 993xx series codes allows pediatricians to bill for coordination of care of special needs children without face to face visits. You can report these care plan oversight CPO codes as 99374-99380 for Doctor supervision. This is only for when the patient is not present for the following doctors services, a) revision or development of care plans for multidisciplinary and complex modalities. b) related lab and other studes review c) patient status

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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434.91 – Stroke – Hemorrhage or Both?

When using 434.91 make sure you take all of the specifics into account. When a doctor says that a patient has had a stroke make sure that you know all of the details of the situation or else some procedures can be hard to justify and therefore your medical billing reimbursement may be denied. In the past for diagnosis of a stroke the ICD-9 index listed 436, which is acute but ill defined cerebrovascular disease, as the code to use. Now the index has code 434.91 as the code to use. This is cerebral artery occlusion, unspecified with cerebral infarction. The new ICD-9 index automatically translates a doctors diagnosis of

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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ICD-9 Updates Coming October 1, 2007

Are you ready for the updates coming on October 1? There are a number of changes that will affect that way Medicare reimburses your practice for the services rendered as well as adding and retiring other codings. All of these changes will be effective for service dates after October 1. You can avoid a lot of paperwork hassles and denials by making the jump to outsourcing your medical billing. Your third party partner will keep up with the ICD-9 coding changes, rules and regulations and if you choose, can even do an audit of your current medical billing methods and show you how you can realize a better reimbursement rate

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Can Your Practice Benefit From the Auditory Rehabilitation Boost?

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have recently made it known that the reimbursement for procedural code 92696 is going to be increases by a rather large amount. To clarify a little bit further, the reimbursement to providers for such a procedure will come in at approximately four times the amount being received currently. This should make any of the providers of language, speech and hearing much happier when it comes to medical billing. This entire thought of reimbursement may be a lot clearer if it is broken down a bit. For example, the code 92626 which is known for the description of Evaluation of Auditory Rehabilitation Status; first

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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The Sensitive Issue of Handling Hard Copies

A question that comes up often is exactly how should a medical practice dispose of the hard copies of files? The answer isn’t rocket science, shredding is the only good answer. When you are ready to dispose of hard copies medical files, anything with a patient’s name on it should be shredded. If you don’t have the staff available and you don’t want to invest in an industrial-sized shredder, a good alternative would be to hire an outside shredding service that will either come to your offices and shred on site; or pick up your files, lock and store them in sealed containers and put them on a closed end

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Are Your E-Transmissions HIPAA Compliant?

If you haven’t taken the time to evaluate your data; both the data that you actively send as well as the data at rest. If you don’t you could be in violation of the new HIPAA violations. The last security rule made by HIPAA (and while the final ruling does not mandate that you encrypt all of your email transmission)it does require that you examine how all of your data is transferred on an overall scale. There are two key items that will help you evaluate how your data is transmitted. (1)integrity controls and (2)encryption. Integrity control sounds a little confusing, but it really just means proper access controls and

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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Been Hit With Medically Unlikely Edits Denials?

It can happen to any individual who is involved with coding, dealing with MUEs can end up being a nightmare if you do not know when and how to use them. MUEs, which is short for the term Medically Unlikely Edits, happen to be put in place to try and help limit the amount of billing errors. The more you understand them, the better off you will be when you find that you need to use them. If you are worried about dealing with MUEs, then you really should know that you are not alone. Luckily, there are a couple of things that you can look to and keep in

By: Melissa Clark, CCS-P, RT - CEO
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